Mission Family Life

Since getting back to Honduras after our visit to the USA in July, our family has faced several challenges.

Two of our great full-time clinic doctors had to leave the work here for kingdom building elsewhere.  That leaves us somewhat short staffed on the clinic and call side of things. Which has been hard for our family-work-time balance. But I am thankful for the time they gave here, the things they taught me, and the legacy and contributions to our mission they both left behind.

Another difficulty our family faced was having multiple bouts with an unknown febrile illness (we tested negative for the infectious diseases our hospital can test for, including COVID). It left Bethany and I barely able to function for a few days at a time, then after a slow recovery it or another illness struck again. As I started writing this, Bethany and Lydia were febrile and resting together on the couch facing a third bout. We are thankful to be presently fever free and well.

Thank you friends and family who have written in or called to check up on us. Thank you prayer warriors who pray for us daily.

A few nights ago we had a hot-potato style thankfulness game. Here in Honduras my family and I are thankful for things we didn’t even realize were important to us in the USA.

  • My kids are thankful for electricity (we have had several weeks of near daily power outages lasting 2-12 hours).
  • They are also thankful for generators, and rechargeable things.
  • We are thankful for air-conditioners to cool our rooms down at night and for fans by day.
  • My girls are thankful for lychee, nance, mango, coconut and Popeye’s biscuits.
  • I am thankful for 4 healthy children who all breathe, eat, drink, move, poop and pee (yes, I used those all individually in our game- and won).
  • We are thankful for a great dependable vehicle.
  • A faithful God.
  • Wonderful supporters who trust us with generous support. 
  • Internet access.
  • Ruth said, “I’m thankful for Daddy, no… Daddy’s phone, no Daddy’s phone and Daddy.” (She really likes the wood turning and glass blowing videos we watch together on my phone.)

The work here is good. There are opportunities to minister to the sick, to heal in the name of Jesus, to offer comfort, wisdom and prayers.

Please continue to pray for us.

I was recently trying to thread a central line catheter through a newborn’s umbilical artery – to deliver IV antibiotics and preempt another newborn sepsis case. The process is very delicate and one has to push and twist just hard enough to get the catheter to pass through the natural twists and turns the artery takes, without pushing too hard. When (not if) you push too hard, you push through the wall of the artery and begin creating a false track – a path that will go nowhere and eventually dead-end. As I was attempting yet again to feed the catheter I said, “It’s so easy to create a false tract!” to Carolina, our Nurse-Midwife who was assisting me. She replied, “In life too.” Eventually, praise the Lord, we got the line placed and were able to get the baby his antibiotics and then discharge him home a few days later.

Picture borrowed from a great step-by-step guide to Umbilical Vein Catheterization by the Australian Government. Given the variety of conditions I see and treat, I often read step-by-step guides such as this.

In that vein (or artery), we are seeking and trying to carefully discern God’s will for our future – because it is so easy to go our own way and believe it is right (until we hit those dead-ends). Things have been hard lately, and it would be easy to take that to mean we should head back to the USA. Conversely, it would be easy to let our pride and the expectations of others guide us to keep on keeping on. Come July our contract with Samaritan’s Purse will be ending and we will have to decide if and with which organization we will commit to further time.

  • Pray that God will give us clarity regarding how long he wants our family to stay here in Honduras.
  • Pray that more doctors, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants will feel called to come and work here (and then do so).
  • Pray for the country of Honduras, with its upcoming presidential election in November.
  • Pray for Bethany and I as we face the challenges of parenting and homeschooling (which can be hard no matter where you are).
  • And continue to pray that I would have wisdom, grace, humility, and love in my role as a physician.

Grace and Peace,
Nathan Gilley

Homeschooling

4 thoughts on “Mission Family Life”

  1. Praying for you, Nathan and Bethany. I pray especially that God would direct you all to select the right long term sending agency. I also pray that God would send additional care providers to assist in the work and ministry.
    En Cristo, Lance

    Sent from my iPhone

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  2. Nathan, Bethany and your sweet girls, Thanks so much,in your very busy schedule to send the ‘outpost’ keeping us updated on what is happening in your very busy life…..we do rejoice in seeing everyone this summer and continue to pray for wisdom in work and family, especially for the decision to stay there or move as God directs you……God will show you and open the window giving you direction in His perfect timing..we pray healing for your physical illness and Wisdom In all your work…May God bless you and keep you in the days ahead… Faithfully, Jack and Brenda

    Sent from my iPad

    >

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